As of March 20, 2020 and by Decree 297/20, the entire country entered a period of social,

preventive and obligatory isolation.

What does this mean?

That you cannot leave your home except to provide yourself with essential items, such as food,

cleaning supplies and medicines.

If you do not comply with these rules, you are breaking the law.


If you have traveled to a country where the virus is spreading or have been in contact with

someone who tested positive, you must stay in isolation for 14 days.

If you have any of the symptoms, call free of charge at 107.


For more information, send an email to turismo@buenosaires.gob.ar

Day 5 | A week in Buenos Aires
Palermo, the Colegiales flea market, Belgrano and Chinatown.

Morning

Start the day in Palermo, at Plaza Cortázar (ex Plaza Serrano). The bars here get packed in the evenings, but it's calm in the mornings, and there are many good places for breakfast, and design and fashion shops for a bit of shopping afterwards. The square also has a merry-go-round for kids. 

Look out for the graffiti-covered alleyways Soria, Santa Rosa and Russell, and the Calle Borges, named in honour of the famous writer who lived in this area.

Midday

Walk straight along Honduras and take bus 39 to Av. Córdoba and Ravignani to pay a visit to the Colegiales flea market (Mercado de Pulgas). There you can find everything from antiques furniture to old records and photographs. Nearby is the Plaza Mafalda, a green space with benches and paintings in tribute to Argentina's favourite comic strip character, Quino's Mafalda.

For lunch, you can go for traditional Argentine food at Las Cabras (Fitz Roy 1795), macrobiotic food at Ohsawa (Honduras 5900), vegetarian food at BA Verde (Gorriti 5657) or hamburgers at Pérez H (Honduras 5509).  

Afternoon

At Av. Córdoba and Arévalo, we can take bus 168 to the junction of Cabildo and Juramento in the Belgrano neighbourhood, originally a suburb where people had their weekend homes. The journey may take up to about 30 minutes.

Near Cabildo and Juramento, there's the circular church Parroquia de la Inmaculada Concepción (Vuelta de Obligado 2042), opposite Plaza Manuel Belgrano (Cuba y Av. Juramento), and the Museo Larreta (Av. Juramento 2291). A little further afield, the Solar de la Abadía shopping centre (Av. Luis María Campos 1426) is worth a visit if you're looking for fashion. As the afternoon draws to a close head to the sloping hills of the Barrancas de Belgrano to relax and join the locals partaking in one of the city's most popular traditions - drinking mate in the park.    

Night

Leave the Barrancas and head across to the corner of Juramento and Arribeños, where Buenos Aires' Barrio Chino, or Chinatown, begins. Taiwanese immigrants began settling in this area in the 1980s and there are now many Chinese restaurants and supermarkets. For dinner, there are excellent options, such as Lai-Lai (Arribeños 2168), Palitos (Arribeños 2245), Hong-Kong Style (Montañeses 2149), Lotus Neo-Thai (for Thai food - Arribeños 2265), and the Japenese restaurant Nobiru (Mendoza 1627).

Tip

During the morning, the itinerary passed close to the discount fashion outlets in Villa Crespo. For brand names at discount prices, look at the shops in and around Aguirre (600 - 900), Gurruchaga (700 - 900) and Loyola (500 - 700). 

Other options

Eight blocks from Plaza Manuel Belgrano is an area called Belgrano R, a very leafy area with large, luxurious houses. Plaza Castelli is the cultural and gastronomic centre of the area.

 

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